Creating thought leaders - why PIPP is important

02-Sep-2019

As discussed in the previous post, the Philanthropic Impact Pioneers Programme (PIPP) began as a response to the findings in the Philanthropy: Towards a Better Practise Model report. The report showed a strong disconnect between the grant seekers and grant makers regarding funding priorities, evaluation and social impact.

Why PIPP is important

PIPP’s importance lies in the knowledge it passes on and the way it will help to shape the Australian grantmaking sector in the years to come.

PIPP is giving the philanthropy sector a new model upon which to hang practises--one which encourages more strategic, evidence-led practice. The improvement of relationships and communication between grant makers and grant seekers will lead to more impactful funding choices and more effective implementation of funded activities.

PIPP creates thought leaders

The ten organisations that are taking part in the PIPP programme will become leaders by example, modelling best practise by what they’ve learned. By working to focus on desired outcomes, improve mission focus, and embrace agile strategies that allow for adaptation as it is required; the cohort will model for the broader philanthropy sector how organisations can improve how they help NFPs, who in turn will be able to help their target communities in more effective ways.

To date, no-one in Australia has undertaken such an open shared learning experience. The 2013 APSIC Arts Philanthropy: Towards a Better Practise Model was created as a body of research but was not specifically Australian-focussed and did not have the same guidance plan that PIPP is offering its cohort.